It’s Time To Drop the “C” From NCAA

College football uses its stadium about 8 days a year. It stands as a monument to Higher Education's waste of resources.

College football uses its stadium about 8 days a year. It stands as a monument to Higher Education’s waste of resources.

Athletes making more appearances in court than in class. Millions of dollars spent to recruit athletes, only to have them jump to a professional league before they graduate. Athletes that have paid staff minders to make sure they go to class, do their homework, and study. Money donated by alumni to only benefit major athletic programs. When will universities admit that big sports is not compatible with higher education?

Money for nothing. Donors giving to big sport programs

Money for nothing. Donors giving to big sport programs

The excuses are wearing thin. The NCAA tries to sell the idea during the televised college football or basketball game, the athletes on the field or court will become great scientists, doctors, and lawyers. Of course, the examples are all athletes of every other sport.

Maybe a donor that will only give to athletics is not the person to associate with higher education?

Maybe a donor that will only give to athletics is not the person to associate with higher education?

The marriage between sports and colleges is a joke and it’s time for a divorce. The National Athletic Association (NCAA) should become the National Athletic Association (NAA.) We know college basketball and football athlete’s first, second, and third priorities are in pursuit of a big professional contract. To deny this is just an excuse to make us feel better when they sit in the back of the college classroom playing on their phones.

Make the professional leagues pay for bringing along young athletes and let higher education focus on education.

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Taxes and a Citizen’s Responsibilities

A massive structure to hold thousands of people above the ground for a few hours on a few days each year...AKA: the college football statium

A massive structure to hold thousands of people above the ground for a few hours on a few days each year…AKA: the college football stadium

290°  I find certain political discussions sad. Among those discussions are one’s that start with, “Why should we waste money on…” or “We can’t afford to….” or “Why should I have to pay for…” In every case is the idea that unless person directly benefits from something, it is a waste of money and/or they have no obligation to help pay for it.

Over the last seventy years, trillions of tax dollars have been spent for roads, sewers, water systems, schools, and monuments. Today, some people take our country’s infrastructure for granted and they believe maintenance and replacement of existing systems and buildings is too expensive. 

If I were to try to convince someone to help pay for a large structure to hold thousands of people up in the air to have a better view of an event that only happens a few times a year, most people would question why they should contribute to the effort. Yet, tell them it is for a football stadium for their favorite local college team and many of those same people would not hesitate to write a check.

The difference is that people will financially support their local college team, but they have to be convinced to contribute their fair share for the infrastructure that makes our affluent American society possible. Taxes are not optional. They are part of the cost of living in the United States of America. Taxes are not evil, they are an investment in America’s future.